Top destinations in Xian

What can you see in Xian and China? Big Goose Pagoda Big Wild Goose Pagoda is located inside Daci’en Temple, a holy place in the middle of a vibrant and modern growing city of Xian. It is a good place to learn about the influence of China’s Buddhism and culture. It is an active Buddhist temple with monks chanting, working and living. Local Chinese visit the place to worship and burn joss sticks. So the pagoda is part of Daci’en Temple, which were both originally built in Tang Dynasty (618-907) and the temple precedes the pagoda. Huaqing Hot Spring People usually visit Huaqing Hot Spring on the way to or back from the Terracotta Army since this site is located under the Lishan Mountain just 8 km east of the Terracotta Warriors and Horse Museum.

There was a time when Hong Kong’s filmic output was only bested by Hollywood and Bollywood, and while it’s a less prodigious beast these days, the city’s film industry still once produced illustrious names like Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, Jet Li, the Shaw Brothers, John Woo and Wong Kar-wai. Avenue of Stars pays tribute to these figures and many others who have helped burnish Hong Kong’s cinematic legacy. Selfie opportunities come with sculptures of these actors and actresses along the waterfront, plus you can check out their handprints on all the plaques. Even Hong Kong’s beloved local cartoon character McDull has a prime spot in front of the Victoria Harbour skyline. Plus, there’s themed exhibitions where you can learn more about the Hong Kong film industry’s history in more detail.

China is a fabulous location if you are looking for adventure and ancient history feeling. It was while digging wells on the outskirts of Xi’an in the 1970s that farmers stumbled across what was to be China’s most important archeological find: the Terracotta Army. Distributed over three large underground pits and built to guard the First Emperor’s tomb were more than 8,000 life-size warriors, some 520 horses, and more than 100 chariots, along with numerous other non-military characters dating from around 280 BC. Although some were severely damaged due to the passing of time, many of the statues unearthed have been painstakingly re-assembled and stand as testament to the importance bestowed upon the emperor and the afterlife. The site — part of the Emperor Qin Shi Huang’s Mausoleum Site Park — is one of China’s most important tourist destinations and offers the unforgettable experience of standing in front of this assembly of soldiers and horses as if inspecting a centuries-old parade. See additional details on Beijing tours.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site set amidst “the loveliest mountains of China,” Mount Huangshan, aka Mount Yellow, is a once-in-a-lifetime trek for many Chinese. The 1,863-meter mountain is renowned for its oddly shaped pines, spectacular rock formations, hot springs and seas of misty and melancholy clouds. A trip here provides a mountain of feeling. Major cities connected to Huangshan Airport by direct flights include Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Xi’an.

Located in the very heart of Beijing, magnificent Forbidden City, also known as Imperial Palace Museum, is the symbol of imperial power. Built in Yongle Period, Ming Dynasty (1406 – 1420 AD), it is the largest and well-preserved wooden building complex of the world. These were laid out very precisely in accordance with a feudal code of architectural hierarchy which designated specific features for reflecting the paramount authority and status of the emperor. Forbidden City can be taken as a sample of the traditional Chinese palatial architecture. In 1987, it became a World Heritage Site. Besides, it is also listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world.

Perched precariously halfway up a cliff some 75 meters (246 feet) above the ground, the Hanging Monastery is one of the most remarkable sights in China. Consisting of a complex of 40 rooms linked together by mid-air corridors and walkways, this remarkable monastery appears to be glued to the side of a sheer precipice. The original monastery was built in the 5th century and has been repaired and extended many times during its long history. Reed Flute Cave known as “the Palace of Natural Arts” is located in the northwest of Guilin in southern China. According to a legend, Reed Flute Cave got its name because people believed that the reed by the cave’s mouth could be made into flutes. The limestone cave offers a majestic fairyland of stalactites, stalagmites, stone pillars, stone curtains, birds, plants and animals in fantastic shapes and colors. Read extra info on China Travel Tours.

AlexMoore Author